Explore Snow Sanctuaries

Get to Know Snow Sanctuaries

Friends of Plumas Wilderness is dedicated to preserving snow sanctuaries and quality human-powered snowsports experiences on the Lassen, Plumas and Sierraville Ranger District of the Tahoe National Forest.

We encourage people to explore snow sanctuaries and advocate for their protection. Please respect wildlife and other visitors. Winter backcountry users should take an avalanche course, wear a beacon, and carry a shovel and probe pole.

Winter recreation opportunities include both front-country and backcountry areas on the Plumas and Lassen National Forests, Plumas-Eureka State Park and Lassen Volcanic National Park.

Big Creek Staging Area

Plumas National Forest

Big Creek Trail

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing, OSV riding
Land Manager Plumas National Forest
Trail Big Creek Trail – County Road 423
Trailhead / Elevation Big Creek Staging Area / 4000’
Access Road Paved
Distance You decide
Difficulty Easiest
Terrain Gentle climb on a paved road
Elevation Gain / Loss You decide
USGS Quad Maps Meadow Valley

Only nine miles west of Quincy, Big Creek Trail provides quick access for skiing when there is snow at lower elevations. The route is groomed when there is sufficient snowfall.

Enjoy views to Big Creek as you ski along a snow-covered road winding through Sierra Mixed-Conifer forests. Look for the Beckworth Trail marker approximately 30’ above the road just past the intersection with 24N99X.

To get to the Big Creek Staging Area take the Quincy–Oroville Highway, State Highway 162, past Meadow Valley and turn south onto Big Creek Road, County Road 423.

Cross-country skiers enjoy fresh powder on Big Creek Trail, County Road 423.

Bucks Summit Staging Area

Plumas National Forest

Bucks Creek Trail Loop

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Biking
Land Manager Plumas National Forest
Trail Bucks Creek Loop Trail
Trailhead / Elevation Bucks Summit / 5536’
Access Road Paved, 4WD and chains may be required
Distance 4.3 miles
Difficulty Intermediate
Terrain Gently rolling
Elevation Gain / Loss 375’ / 375’
USGS Quad Maps Meadow Valley, Bucks Lake

This non-motorized, single-track trail is a great place to cross-country ski or snowshoe in winter.  The Summit Trail, or South Loop, is well marked and easy to follow.  The Bucks Trail, or North Loop, can be difficult to follow when untracked.  If you lose the trail, just head north and get onto the Quincy-Oroville Highway.

The Bucks Creek Loop Trail starts 200 feet west of the Bucks Summit Staging Area sign on the south side of the Quincy–Oroville Highway.  Look closely for the “Bucks Creek Loop 4.3” sign.  If you miss the sign and make it to the bottom of the hill, take 24N29Y south to the Bucks Creek Loop Trailhead.

The Bucks Creek Loop Trail sign at Bucks Summit.


Pacific Crest Trail – Bucks Summit south to 24N29Y

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing
Land Manager Plumas National Forest
Trail Pacific Crest Trail south to 24N29Y
Trailhead / Elevation Bucks Summit / 5536’
Access Road Paved, 4WD and chains may be required
Distance 4.0 miles from Bucks Summit to 24N29Y on PCT
Difficulty Intermediate
Terrain PCT contours above Big Creek Road
Elevation Gain / Loss 224’ / 320’ from Bucks Summit to 24N29Y
USGS Quad Maps Meadow Valley, Dogwood Peak, Haskins Valley, Bucks Lake

Human-powered winter travelers can head south from the Bucks Lake Staging Area along the Pacific Crest Trail for approximately 4.0 miles before intersecting with 24N29Y.  Skiers can return via the PCT or complete a clockwise loop by returning to Bucks Summit via 24N29Y.  The return trip via 24N29Y is approximately 5.0 miles.  This route is open to Over-Snow Vehicles.

Cross-country skiers enjoy fresh powder on Big Creek Trail, County Road 423.


Pacific Crest Trail – Bucks Summit north to Spanish Peak

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing, Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding, Winter Camping
Land Manager Plumas National Forest
Trail Pacific Crest Trail north to Spanish Peak
Trailhead / Elevation Bucks Summit / 5536’
Access Road Paved, 4WD and chains may be required
Distance 5.5 miles to Spanish Peak on the PCT
Difficulty Intermediate / Advanced
Terrain Steep, Remote
Elevation Gain / Loss 1,481’ / 1,481’
USGS Quad Maps Meadow Valley, Bucks Lake

The Bucks Lake Wilderness is a winter wonderland for human-powered sports!  The only non-motorized winter recreation area on the Plumas National Forest, the Wilderness provides winter visitors with opportunities for solitude and unconfined human-powered recreation.

In winter, the easiest access to the Bucks Lake Wilderness is from the Bucks Summit Staging Area.

Human-powered winter travelers can head north along the Pacific Crest Trail or “skin” straight up the ridge and intersect with the PCT.  Between the Staging Area and Spanish Peak the terrain provides many opportunities for turns if there is sufficient snow.  Winter backcountry explorers should have avalanche training and carry a shovel, probe and beacon.  Have fun and be safe!

Bucks Lake Wilderness on PCT

Meadow Valley Area

Plumas National Forest

Snake Lake Road

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing, OSV riding
Land Manager Plumas National Forest
Trail Snake Lake Road – County Road 435
Trailhead / Elevation Shooting Range / 3368’
Access Road Paved
Distance 2.0 miles to Snake Lake
Difficulty Easiest
Terrain Gentle incline
Elevation Gain / Loss 286’ / 286’
USGS Quad Maps Meadow Valley

When there are several inches of snow in Quincy, you can ski or snowshoe up the Snake Lake Road from the Shooting Range to Snake Lake.  This is a great beginner adventure only 5 miles west of Quincy.

The Snake Lake Road follows Wapaunsie Creek up to Snake Lake.  The Lake is a good place to observe waterfowl if there is open water.  If Snake Lake is frozen solid, it is a fun place to ice skate or ski!

To get to the trailhead, take the Quincy–Oroville Highway, State Highway 162, about 4.5 miles west of Quincy and turn north onto the Snake Lake Road, County Road 435.  When there is snow, the road is plowed just beyond the Shooting Range.

A happy cross-country skier on the Snake Lake Road.

Plumas-Eureka State Park

Plumas National Forest

Cross-country Ski Trails

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing
Land Manager Plumas-Eureka State Park
Trail Jamison Mine Trail
Trailhead / Elevation Jamison Mine Trailhead / 5120’
Access Road Paved
Distance Approximately 2.0 miles to Jamison Mine Complex
Difficulty Easiest
Terrain Level on paved and dirt roads
Elevation Gain / Loss 105’ / 105’ Jamison Mine TH to Campground
USGS Quad Maps Johnsville, Gold Lake

Plumas-Eureka State Park Cross-country Ski Trails are a great place for skiers of all abilities to recreate.  Two trailheads, Jamison Mine and the Museum provide access to a groomed trail network.  The trailheads are located near the town of Johnsville on County Road 506.

From the Jamison Mine Trailhead to the Campground is approximately 2.0 miles and from the Museum to the Campground is a little less than 2.0 miles.  There are spectacular views to Jamison Creek and surrounding peaks from the trails.

Plumas-Eureka State Park Cross-country Ski Trail map


Museum to McRae Meadows

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing
Land Manager Plumas-Eureka State Park / Plumas National Forest
Trail County Road 507
Trailhead / Elevation Plumas-Eureka State Park Museum / 5168’
Access Road Paved
Distance 2.0 miles to Forest boundary, 4.0 miles to Ross Camp, 6.0 miles to McRae Meadows
Difficulty Intermediate
Terrain Level on paved roads, gentle climb on dirt roads
Elevation Gain / Loss 1200’ / 1200’ Museum to McRae Meadows
USGS Quad Maps Johnsville, Gold Lake, Mount Fillmore, Blue Nose

Cross-country skiing from the Plumas-Eureka Museum to McRae Meadows is a great adventure for intermediate cross-country skiers with avalanche and navigation skills.  From the Museum, follow the groomed ski trail along Jamison Creek to the Campground.  With significant snowfall, Country Road 507 beyond the Campground is prone to avalanches coming off the south side of Eureka Peak.  Check avalanche forecasts and carry a beacon, shovel and probe.  Skiers may find powder in Jamison Creek Canyon long after a snowstorm as the area receives little sunlight in winter.  Ross Camp is a good destination where you can find some sun.  If you wish to keep going to McRae Meadows, continue on County Road 507.  At the top of Jamison Creek, CR507 intersects with 24N08 heading to The A Tree.  From here, CR507 is relatively level as it heads north along East Nelson Creek to McRae Meadows.

Jamison Creek Canyon near Ross Camp.


Johnsville Ski Area

The Johnsville Ski Area is located at the end of the paved road one mile beyond Johnsville.  The access road is typically well maintained, but during heavy snowfall the road above town may not be plowed.

The Johnsville Ski Area is home of the longboard races, held the second Sunday in January, February and March, snow permitting.  Longboard races were first held at nearby Onion Valley in 1861 and are the first document ski competition in North America.  The revival longboard races are always fun to witness as skiers in period clothing reach remarkable speeds on twelve-foot homemade boards.  A lot of nerve, a little whiskey and just the right amount of “dope” (wax concoction applied to skis) are key to winning.

Longboarders line up to race at the Johnsville Ski Area.


Mount Washington

Activities Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding
Land Manager Plumas-Eureka State Park / Plumas National Forest
Route Unmarked
Trailhead / Elevation Plumas-Eureka State Park Museum / 5168’
Access Road Paved
Distance 4.0 miles from Museum to Mt. Washington
Difficulty Expert
Terrain Steep, remote
Elevation Gain / Loss 2200’ / 2200’ Museum to Mt. Washington (7369’)
USGS Quad Maps Johnsville, Gold Lake

The avalanche chute on the north side of Mt. Washington is steep and can hold deep powder.  Anyone taking on this adventure must be an expert backcountry skier with navigation skills and avalanche training.  Always check the avalanche forecast and carry a beacon, probe and shovel.

The traditional route up Mt. Washington is from the Plumas-Eureka Museum, crossing Jamison Creek at the campground bridge, and heading south through the forest to the northeast ridge.  Once on the ridge, your objective is obvious.

Use good judgment in determining your descent.  Dig a snow pit to evaluate the snowpack.  If the snowpack is stable, you can ski a series of steep open areas due north of the peak.  You can descend your skin track, if you determine the risk is greater than the reward.

Mount Washington is a classic Plumas County ski.  In the 1930’s, two men from Quincy liked skiing Mt. Washington so much they put a lift in the north-facing chute.  When an avalanche destroyed the lift, they relocated it to Eureka Peak.

View of Mount Washington (center) and Eureka Peak (right) from Mount Elwell.


Mount Elwell

Activities Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding
Land Manager Plumas-Eureka State Park / Plumas National Forest
Route Unmarked
Trailhead / Elevation Plumas-Eureka State Park Museum / 5168’
Access Road Paved
Distance Approx. 7.0 miles from Museum to Mount Elwell
Difficulty Expert
Terrain Steep, remote
Elevation Gain / Loss 2650’ / 2650’ Museum to Mount Elwell (7818’)
USGS Quad Maps Johnsville, Gold Lake

Mount Elwell (7,818) can be accessed from the Plumas-Eureka State Park Museum, the Jamison Mine Trailhead or the Gold Lake Staging Area.  All routes require that you are an expert backcountry skier with solid navigation skills and avalanche training.  Before taking on this adventure seek local knowledge, check the avalanche forecast, and be prepared to spend the night out.

From the Plumas-Eureka Museum, follow the groomed trail south to the campground.  Cross Jamison Creek at the bridge and head south on the northeast shoulder of Mount Washington.  Aim for the unnamed lake at 5997’.  From the unnamed lake, traverse the east side of Mount Washington, west of Grass Lake heading for Wades Lake.  From Wades Lake, travel east to Jamison Lake and up the west side of Mount Elwell.  There is a lot of amazing ski terrain along this route.  If you cannot meet your turn around time, make some turns wherever you make it to!

When there is adequate snow to cover the Little Jamison Creek Trail, a more direct route up Mount Elwell is from the Jamison Mine Trailhead.  From the Jamison Mine, head up the Little Jamison Creek Trail to Grass Lake.  From Grass Lake, choose a route that avoids cliff bands and climb toward the false summit (7681’).  Do not attempt this route when there is insufficient snow to cover the Little Jamison Creek Trail as it is rocky and steep.

From the Gold Lake Staging Area, take the Lakes Basin Ski Trail to the Smith Lake Trailhead.  From the Smith Lake Trailhead, climb the east-facing ridge to join the Mount Elwell Trail.  Follow the Mount Elwell Trail to gain the false summit or the true summit.  This route does not offer the open ski terrain found west of Mount Elwell but you can make turns in the red fir forests south of Smith Lake and on the open east-facing slope above the Smith Lake Trailhead.

On top of the 7,681’ false summit. Mount Elwell (7,818’) is left of the skier.

Mount Elwell from the northeast shoulder of Mount Washington.

The Lost Sierra Traverse

Plumas National Forest

The Lost Sierra Traverse

Activities Backcountry Skiing
Land Manager Plumas National Forest / Plumas-Eureka State Park
Route Unmarked
Trailhead / Elevation Plumas-Eureka State Park Museum / 5168’
Access Road Paved
Distance Depends on Quincy-LaPorte Road conditions
Difficulty Expert / snow camping skills required
Terrain Steep, very remote
Elevation Gain / Loss Depends on where you leave your shuttle vehicle
USGS Quad Maps Johnsville, Gold Lake, Mount Fillmore, Blue Nose Mountain, Onion Valley

The Lost Sierra Traverse is a multiple day adventure along the northern Sierra crest between the historic mining towns of Johnsville and Onion Valley. The trek roughly follows the Pacific Crest Tail between The A Tree and Onion Valley. For some segments, it is preferable to stay on the ridge and follow the Plumas-Sierra county line rather than the PCT. Skiers undertaking this adventure need to have snow camping skills, avalanche training, and carry beacon, shovel and probe. Consult with locals who have done the trip if possible and check avalanche forecasts if there has been recent snowfall.

Lightweight telemark boots and bindings with waxless skis are recommended for the Lost Sierra Traverse as many miles of the journey are along undulating ridgelines. Late-March and early-April are an ideal time of year to do the trip, as longer days and spring snow conditions will allow you to travel farther each day. If there is a thin snowpack, be prepared to hike some of the lower elevation sections. Carrying a lightweight pair of shoes is a good idea if it is a low snow year.

You will need to set a shuttle for this adventure.  Leave a vehicle as far up the Quincy-LaPorte Road as you can get it.  The Quincy-LaPorte Road, Plumas County Road 511, heads south of State Highway 70 a mile east of Quincy.

During winter months, the Quincy-LaPorte Road is cleared seven miles south of Highway 70.  In the spring, the road is cleared as far as the Road Department can when they have time.  Call the Plumas County Public Works Department at (530) 283-6268 to learn how far you can drive up the road.  Once you drop a vehicle, drive to the Plumas-Eureka State Park Museum near Johnsville to start your adventure.

From the Museum, you can reach the Pacific Crest Trail by skiing up Jamison Creek to The A Tree via County Road 507 and Forest Road 23N08 or you can climb Mount Washington and follow the Mount Washington Trail to the PCT.

Once on the PCT, travel west to the unnamed 7496’ peak 0.5 miles north of Gibraltar.  Stay on the crest to see the most spectacular terrain on the traverse.  South of Gibraltar there are broad, open blue runs.  If you want to make turns on your trip, you should camp in this area.

Follow the ridge to Beartrap Mountain then descend through the red fir forest along the Plumas-Sierra county line to Plumas County Road 900.  Follow CR900 south of Stafford Mountain and Mount Etna.  Return to the PCT at Bunker Hill Ridge, northwest of Mount Etna.  You can head off-trail or take 22N47Y to climb up to Bunker Hill Ridge.

Bunker Hill Ridge is relatively flat for three miles and is a good place to winter camp.  It is far enough from Onion Valley, a popular snowmobile destination, that you should have some quiet.   The home of the 1st ski competition in North America is now a snowmobile Mecca and most skiers have been displaced.  Follow Bunker Hill Ridge to Gibsonville Ridge and Pilot Peak.  Drop into Onion Valley northwest of Pilot Peak and follow the Quincy-LaPorte Road back to your vehicle.

Celebrate with a beer at the Brewing Lair of the Lost Sierra to celebrate completing the Lost Sierra Traverse.

Spectacular views and solitude are abundant on the Lost Sierra Traverse.

The crux of the traverse is west of peak 7276’ (in shadow at top center of pic)

Untracked snow awaits the few who venture deep into the Lost Sierra.

Onion Valley, the site of the 1st ski races in North America, is now a popular snowmobile destination. Pilot Peak is on the left side of the photo.


Thompson Peak

Activities Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding
Land Manager Plumas National Forest
Route Unmarked
Trailhead / Elevation Janesville Grade 28N01 & 28N02 / 6000’
Access Road Paved
Distance Approx. 3.0 miles from the trailhead to the peak
Difficulty Advanced
Terrain Steep, remote
Elevation Gain / Loss 1795’ / 1795’
USGS Quad Maps Janesville, Antelope Lake

The west side of Thompson Peak offers skiers open blue runs with amazing views.  To undertake this adventure you need to be an advanced skier with avalanche training, navigation skills and carry a beacon, shovel and probe.

Access is via the Janesville Grade, Lassen County Road 208.  Drive approximately 5.5 miles up the grade and park at the intersection with 28N02.  Parking space is limited so be considerate of where you leave your vehicle.

Travel northwest up the ridge paralleling above 28N02B for approximately 2.0 miles.  When you get to the top of Clarks Creek, head west northwest for about a mile until you run into 28N02A, follow it to the Thompson Peak Lookout.  Descend the route you climbed.  Enjoy this classic Diamond Mountains ski and have a Thompson Peak Pilsner at Lassen Ale Works in Susanville to celebrate your adventure!

View to Honey Lake from the open slopes on the west side of Thompson Peak.

Lassen National Forest

Lassen National Forest

Lake Almanor Recreation Trail

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing
Land Manager Lassen National Forest
Trail Lake Almanor Recreation Trail
Trailhead / Elevation Lake Almanor North / 4660’
Access Road Paved
Distance You decide
Difficulty Easiest
Terrain Relatively flat paved path
Elevation Gain / Loss You decide
USGS Quad Maps Almanor

The Lake Almanor Recreation Trail is a wonderful place to cross-country ski or snowshoe. Winter visitors travel along Lake Almanor among large conifers. Wildlife is abundant on the water and in the woods.

The 9.5 mile long Lake Almanor Recreation Trail is a paved path with four trailheads. The Lake Almanor North Trailhead is located on 27N52 just east of the intersection of State Highway 89 and the Humbug-Humboldt Cross Road. The Five Mile Trailhead is located on Plumas County Road 310 one mile south of Pratville. Dyer View is located on CR 310 one mile south of Five Mile. The southernmost trailhead is at the intersection of Highway 89 and 27N23.


Colby Meadows

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing
Land Manager Lassen National Forest
Trail 26N59
Trailhead / Elevation Jonesville Snowmobile Park / 4920’
Access Road Paved
Distance 5.0 miles from trailhead to Colby Mountain (6001’)
Difficulty Easiest
Terrain Flat in Colby Meadow / steeper roads climb ridge
Elevation Gain / Loss 1081, / 1081’
USGS Quad Maps Jonesville, Humboldt Peak, Onion Butte

Colby Meadows is a great place for human-powered winter recreation only an hour away from Chico. Access to Colby meadows is from the Jonesville Snowmobile Park. To get to the trailhead from the Sacramento Valley, take State Highway 32 east from Chico. After approximately 30 miles, exit at the Humboldt Road, Butte County Road 914. Follow the Humboldt Road for approximately 11.0 miles. You will pass through Butte Meadows about half way to the Jonesville Snowmobile Park. The Colby Meadows Trailhead is located at the west end of the parking area. Near the trailhead, a bridge crosses Willow Creek. Once you cross Willow Creek, head west on 26N59 and travel northwest along Colby Creek to the meadows.

If you wish to climb to Colby Mountain, continue up Colby Creek on 26N59 to the Colby Mountain Lookout Road, 27N36. From this intersection, it is about two more miles to the lookout. You can also take 26N28 to get to the Colby Mountain Lookout Road. This route is slightly shorter and steeper. If the weather is clear, those who make it to the lookout are rewarded with views of Lassen Peak.


McGowan Lake Area

Activities Cross-country Skiing, Snowshoeing, Winter Camping
Land Manager Lassen National Forest
Trail 29N22
Trailhead / Elevation Highway 89 & 29N22 / 6200’
Access Road Paved
Distance You decide
Difficulty Easiest
Terrain Flat 1 mile west of trailhead / steeper above 29N22
Elevation Gain / Loss You decide
USGS Quad Maps Lassen Peak

The McGowan Lake Area is a wonderful place for quiet winter recreation only an hour from Red Bluff.  To get here from the Sacramento Valley, take State Highway 36 east of Red Bluff past Mineral.  At Morgan Summit, turn north onto State Highway 89 to Lassen Volcanic National Park.  Two miles north of the intersection of 36 & 89 there is a wide spot in the road.  Forest Road 29N22 provides access to the McGowan Lake Area.

 

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen National Forest

Ridge Lakes

Activities Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding, Snowshoeing
Land Manager Lassen National Park
Trail Ridge Lakes Trail
Trailhead / Elevation Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center / 6720’
Access Road Paved
Distance 2.0 miles from Visitor Center to Ridge Lakes
Difficulty Intermediate
Terrain First mile on road is flat, second mile climbs 1000’
Elevation Gain / Loss 1280’ / 1280’
USGS Quad Maps Lassen Peak

The trail to Ridge Lakes is well marked and is a great adventure for intermediate snowshoers and backcountry skiers.  The terrain above Ridge Lakes is relatively steep and is prone to avalanche during and after snowfall.  If you venture above Ridge Lakes you should have avalanche training and carry a beacon, shovel and probe.

From the Visitor Center, head north on the Park Road to the Sulphur Works.  After you cross the bridge over Sulphur Creek follow the ridge north of the parking area and restroom.  Continue up the ridge as it sweeps to the west toward Ridge Lakes.  The trail is well marked.

 

 

A Feather River College Winter Ecology class explores Lower Ridge Lake.


Brokeoff Mountain

Activities Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding
Land Manager Lassen National Park
Trail Brokeoff Mountain Trail
Trailhead / Elevation Brokeoff Mountain Trailhead / 6800’
Access Road Paved
Distance 3.5 miles from trailhead to Brokeoff Mountain
Difficulty Advanced
Terrain Steep / Remote
Elevation Gain / Loss 2435’ / 2435’
USGS Quad Maps Lassen Peak

Brokeoff Mountain (9235’) is a classic Southern Cascade ski adventure with amazing views of Lassen Volcanic National Park and the Sacramento Valley.  North of the summit is a 1000’ sheer cliff.  The south and southwest-facing slopes can offer excellent skiing if you are there at the right time.

Those who aspire to climb Brokeoff need to be advanced backcountry skiers who have taken an avalanche course, have good navigation skills, and carry a beacon, shovel and probe.  Portions of the route are prone to avalanches.

The route closely follows the Brokeoff Mountain Trail.  From the trailhead, go up the creek that flows from Forest Lake.  After traveling about a mile up the drainage, cross the creek and continue to the clearing on the ridge west of Forest Lake.  Stay in the trees to climb the shoulder of Brokeoff as the slope east of the peak is prone to slide.  Once you’ve gained the shoulder travel north to climb to the peak.

 


Diamond Peak

Activities Backcountry Skiing & Snowboarding, Snowshoeing
Land Manager Lassen National Park
Trail Ranger Cut-off Trail
Trailhead / Elevation Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center / 6720’
Access Road Paved
Distance 2.5 miles from Visitor Center to Diamond Peak
Difficulty Intermediate
Terrain
Elevation Gain / Loss 1248’ / 1248’
USGS Quad Maps Lassen Peak

Those who aspire to ski in the Diamond Mountain area need to be advanced backcountry skiers who have taken an avalanche course, have good navigation skills, and carry a beacon, shovel and probe.  Portions of the route are prone to avalanches.

From the Visitor Center, head north on the Park Road past the Sulphur Works.  Follow the Park Road as it climbs on the east side of Sulphur Creek.  Just past Windy Point, take the Ranger Cut-off toward Diamond Mountain.  Climb the ridge just east of the Park Road to get near Diamond Mountain.  From here, there are a lot of options for your descent.  The easiest route down is the way you came up.  The most difficult is descending the east-facing slope to the Park Road.  Yet another route is to descend via glades north of Diamond Mountain before traversing to the west and south to get to the Sulphur Works.

Between Diamond Mountain and The Sulphur Works there are open slopes with blue runs.

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